eL Seed’s New Scripts – Interview by Johnny Hanson for ARAMCO WORLD

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EL SEED SPOKE BY PHONE
FROM HIS DUBAI STUDIO
Let’s start with “calligraffiti.” There are quite a few artists who do it now. Did you coin the term?
No, to be honest with you, this is a term that has been used the first time in New York for a show, I think in ’84. A show created by Jeffrey Deitch for some calligraphy artists and some graffiti artists from New York. He had this vision 30 years ago that calligraphy and graffiti would merge together. To be honest with you, me today, I don’t even use this word to define myself. I’m just using calligraphy in my artwork. I do sculpture, I do canvases, I do art installations. I’m trying to get out of the box that I think I used to be in a few years ago.
elSeed
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More: http://www.aramcoworld.com/en-US/Articles/July-2017/eL-Seed-s-New-Scripts

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An artist is pasting images of paintings from museums on Indian street corners from Scroll.In

Julien de Casabianca ‘rescues’ the subjects of famous paintings from their frames and takes them for outings in the city.

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When French and Corsican visual artist Julien de Casabianca visited The Louvre, a museum filled with the work of universally revered artists like Leonardo da Vinci, Caravaggio and Rembrandt, he was inspired by an obscure painting featuring a beautiful young female prisoner. “I had a Prince Charming compulsion to liberate her from the castle,” he confessed.

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While the urge to swoop in and save the damsel was a primitive one, de Casabianca’s idea of rescue was unusual – he photographed the painting, printed an enlarged copy of it and pasted it on an old and decrepit wall in Paris.

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An Eleven-Story-Tall Tree Hugger Sprouts on the Side of a Building in Chileby Kate Sierzputowski from Colossal

Italian artist Francesco Camillo Giogino, or Millo (previously here and here), has painted his latest sky-high mural in the heart of Chile. Never Give Up, created in his signature cartoonish style, features a female figure in the forefront clutching the trunk of a tree. The city behind the girl is black and white, causing the eyes to focus most clearly on a single green vine growing from the heart-shaped stump. The work, which aims to express the hope that Millo believes all hold in their hearts, was produced for Hecho En Casa festival this past month. You can see more of his nature-based and murals on his website, and on Facebook.

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More: http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2016/12/an-eleven-story-tall-tree-hugger-sprouts-on-the-side-of-a-building-in-chile/?mc_cid=8682a862ed&mc_eid=0636b89ddf

Discover Egypt’s Revolutionary Street Art, in Washington D.C. Henri Neuendorf, Friday, January 16, 2015 http://news.artnet.com/in-brief/discover-egypts-revolutionary-street-art-in-washington-dc-221957

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An American tourism professional who captured Cairo’s politically charged graffiti during the Arab Spring is organizing an exhibition of her photography in Washington D.C., the Capitol Hill Times reports.

Genevieve Hathaway moved to Egypt in 2011 to help a friend start her tour company. She unexpectedly found herself in the middle of the Egyptian Revolution—at a time when many Egyptian artists took to the streets of Cairo to express themselves.

Hathaway told the Capitol Hill Times “I was living on Tahrir Square watching the street art evolve and nobody was documenting it. This was extremely evocative art that stood a chance of being lost forever, and much of it will never be seen.” Determined to preserve the Egyptian people’s revolutionary art she resolved to document as many murals across Cairo as possible.

Before the Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak was forced to resign in 2011, citizens who voiced opposition to the government were risking jail, torture and even death. However, the danger didn’t discourage some brave individuals from making their feelings known.

“The street art gave people something to talk about in a culture that never allowed political discussion,” Hathaway said. “I want to empower people to see the Arab Spring in a different light. I don’t think the Arab Spring was a failed event. It brought the masses together for a common goal: democracy.”

War on Walls: Egypt’s Arab Spring Street Art is on view at St. Marks Cathedral until February 15

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