On Contemporary Extremism and Cultural Oppression

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iwa

In Medieval times, discrete attempts to diverge from authoritative ideology were tolerated by the Islamic ruling class for art’s sake, fostering a more liberal and independent society of artists. With the emergence of ISIS, we witness the complete suppression of critical thought and freedom of thinking

by Arielle Blattner
Graphic designer and MA Student of Islamic Art

As long as there have been religions, there have been sects. As long as there have been religions and sects, there have been vicious wars between sects. No matter which division, the proclamation of faith written on the flag of ISIS lā ilāha illā allāh (“There is no god but Allah”) is the same phrase written on Islamist medieval coins since the 8th century, and continues to be seen on the flag of ISIS. In addition to spreading Islam being the main goal of these regimes, the suppression of free thought (whether non-muslim…

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The existence of prime matter – II

al-Mubahathat

The Thomists (e.g., Feser, SM 3.1.1, 177-8), when establishing hylomorphism – the doctrine that a body is composed of prime matter (hayula) and form – favour, following Aristotle, a line of argument which proceeds from change.

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The soul’s ‘corporeality of origination’

al-Mubahathat

Mulla Sadra famously held that the human soul is “corporeal (jismani) in origination”. With this, people often say, he radically departed from Avicenna’s view that the soul is an incorporeal being from the very beginning of its existence. But those who claim such a departure on Sadra’s part don’t really clarify what the Sadrian doctrine precisely amounts to. Maybe that’s even partly Sadra’s fault – I don’t know. Whatever the case may be, point is: their unclarity about the content of the doctrine, as far as I’m concerned, renders any claim about a ‘radical departure’ suspect.

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