A History of Mughal Cuisine through Cookbooks from The Heritage Lab

544322_10151555158737139_1234962013_nPreparation of betel for the Sultan Ghiyath al-Din, from The Ni'matnama-i Nasir al-Din Shah, 1495-1505 (opaque w/c on paper)from The Ni'matnama-i Nasir al-Din Shah, 1495-1505 (opaque w/c on paper)coffee_route_06_0h_sp2l_same_size_seq_or_stack_photo_2_of_4_high_res_bl_751430_mincing__lg-1024x714i_sp2l_same_size_seq_or_stack_photo_3_of_4_high_res_bl_751422_detail_c_lg-800x445j_sp2l_same_size_seq_or_stack_photo_4_of_4_high_res_bl_751431_2_lg-1024x527o_sp4l_high_res_bl_751431_sherbet_detail3_smshah-tahmasp-i-and-mughal-emperor-humayun-meet-mural-chehel-sotoun-palace-isfahansweetsa70459bc-b17d-4140-8df6-f16ebdd9600egoldspoonmughal

On any given weekend, my head is usually occupied with the thoughts of food. The taste buds have been working over time for a year now – ever since I started following my friend Richa’s amazing food stories. Turns out that Kings and Royalty had a thing for food too. The cookbooks of Akbar, Shahjahan and Aurangzeb give us an idea of the history of Mughal cuisine. Apart from royal food, you also get to look into their kitchen! For instance, the Ain-i-Akbari mentions that during the reign of Akbar, there was a Minister for Kitchen! He had his own budget, an independent accounts department and ran an army of cooks, tasters, attendants, bearers and other sundry designations. It is true – there was a time when people really lived to eat (and life sounded like Harry Potter books)!

More: http://www.theheritagelab.in/mughal-recipe-history/

The curious tale of Solomon and the Phoenix from the British Library Blog by Dr Sâqib Bâburî Curator, Persian Manuscripts Digitisation Project

6a00d8341c464853ef01b7c8c7f766970b-500wi

One of the more enigmatic manuscripts now in the British Library (IO Islamic 1255) from the rich library of Tipu Sultan, ruler of Mysore (d. 1213/1799), is the untitled qiṣṣah or tale featuring a figure popular across the range of Persian literature, the Prophet Sulaymān (the biblical Solomon, son of David). In this tale, the prophet-king is confronted by the head of the ranks of birds, the Sīmurgh (Phoenix), expressing its disbelief in the doctrine of predestination (qaz̤āʾ va qadr). Having angered Allāh, Jibrāʾīl (the archangel Gabriel) is sent to inform Sulaymān of a prophecy foretelling the birth of the Prince of the East (Malikzādah-′i Mashriq) and the Princess of the West, daughter of the Malik-i Maghrib, who together bear a child out of wedlock. The Sīmurgh believes it can prevent this outcome. Sulaymān and the Sīmurgh conclude an agreement (qawl) to reassess the situation after fifteen years, by which time the accuracy of the prophecy would be apparent.

6a00d8341c464853ef01b8d251ff89970c-500wi6a00d8341c464853ef01b7c8c7f728970b-500wi6a00d8341c464853ef01bb096b0978970d-580wi

 

The Enigmatic Image: Curious Subjects in Indian Art from LACMA UNFRAMED by Stephen Markel, Senior Research Curator South Asian art

For many viewers, the subject of most Indian paintings is understandable even without a specialist’s knowledge of the identity and history of the figures portrayed. For example, images of a princely couple listening to music on a palace terrace can be appreciated without needing to know the historical or literary identity of the protagonists. Beyond this basic intelligibility, however, many works feature complex subject matter, symbolic nuances, and/or compositional substructures that require an in-depth explanation to understand their layers of meaning.

ma-48448

Allegories

Inspired by the iconography and mythology of Western divinity and sovereignty featured in the European prints brought to India, the Mughals and other Islamic dynasties of India soon appropriated the visual attributes of the divine and the regal for their own glorification. Chief among these emulated personages were Solomon and David, kings of ancient Israel; Orpheus and the philosopher Plato, both legendary musicians and poets of ancient Greece; and Majnun, the famous Arabic poet and unconsummated paramour of his beloved Layla. The unifying thread in the stories of these influential personalities was that each was graced with the ability to tame and control animals by means of his musical ability and/or spiritual authority.

m75_4_28-dl01

More: http://unframed.lacma.org/2017/01/05/enigmatic-image-curious-subjects-indian-art