The Gazi Scroll of West Bengal

Painted on paper, mounted on cotton, scrolls such as these were used as visual props in storytelling performances in India approximately around 1800 AD.

Handprinted in Murshidabad, this scroll is around 13 meters in length, with 54 frames which narrate the story of Gazi and Manik – two Muslim saints or pirs. 

Patua scroll artists use natural colours borrowed from leaves and fruits to create art work.

More: https://theheritagelab.wordpress.com/2016/07/22/the-gazi-scroll-of-west-bengal/

The Heritage Lab

Gaziscroll_Fotor_Collage The Gazi Pata Scroll, West Bengal; 1800 (circa)

WHAT IS IT?

Painted on paper, mounted on cotton, scrolls such as these were used as visual props in storytelling performances in India approximately around 1800 AD.

Handprinted in Murshidabad, this scroll is around 13 meters in length, with 54 frames which narrate the story of Gazi and Manik – two Muslim saints or pirs. 

Patua scroll artists use natural colours borrowed from leaves and fruits to create art work.

WHAT IS THE STORY?

Through scrolls, legends have been recorded of a ‘pir’, sometimes called Gazi, although this seems to be no more than a generic name for ‘warrior-saint’ or similar. This ‘pir’ not only brought the new faith to the virgin forests of Sunderbans but also settled new converts in these remote areas, cutting down the impenetrable jungle and taming the wild animals, above all the tiger.

The scroll goes on to narrate the…

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